A number of customers have come in to the shop looking for yarn for making washcloths and dish cloths. I got curious and started poking around, there were so many patterns for these useful, beautiful little items that I had to try one.  It turned out that knitted and crocheted wash cloths are like candy. Wash cloths are small enough to be a purse project. They can be as simple or as elaborate as you want. I've made three so far and I don't see an end in sight.  My gateway wash cloth was the  Vintage Hankie Washcloth  .  This little beauty combines a knitted center with a crocheted edge. I'm working on getting my crochet groove back. This project gave me some crochet practice that I really enjoyed by the end. Those of you who were in the shop when I first started the crocheted edge—crochet and I made up by the end. LOL  I used three colors of Schachenmayr Catania. This 100% cotton sport weight yarn was a pleasure to work with. Catania comes in a 50g/137 yd put up and I worked the pattern with 3.5mm/US4 needles. The yarn has a slight sheen that gives a crisp, fanciness to anything you make out of it. Catania gives beautiful stitch definition yet yields a fabric soft enough for the most tender skin.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     After crocheting the edging on the Vintage Hankie, I was feeling brave enough to try a crocheted washcloth.  The Jazz Age Washcloth   was super fun and very easy to make. I used Schachenmayr Catania again and a 4mm/G hook. This pattern yielded a sturdy wash and dry cloth that was still pretty enough to put out for company.     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     I had some yarn leftover, I put it to good use by whipping up a  Grandmother’s Favorite Washcloth . This is an old pattern that has a number of variations. I used a basic version.      

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     You know how it is when you make something that just tickles your fancy. I launched another wash cloth immediately. This time it was the  Bodhi Leaf Washcloth  , by Julia Farwell-Clay. The the delicate leaf shape was irresistible. I especially liked the thoughtful detail of the hanging loop on worked in to the design.  The yarn is Lang Canapa (DK) in 100% Hemp (25g/88yards).Yep, same plant, but it can't give you a “chemical” high as yarn. Hemp is a great choice for durable products it doesn't shrink, stretch, or pill. Hemp will also soften each time you wash it. Sounds scratchy, right, not even a little bit. Canapa is a smooth tightly spun yarn that works up easily. I used a 3.5 mm/US4 needle. For washcloths, hemp also has the added advantage of drying quickly and being naturally mildew resistant.       

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     You can probably tell I’m on a washcloth tear right now. They’re such quick, satisfying little projects that I think I’ll always have one on the needles or hook.

A number of customers have come in to the shop looking for yarn for making washcloths and dish cloths. I got curious and started poking around, there were so many patterns for these useful, beautiful little items that I had to try one.

It turned out that knitted and crocheted wash cloths are like candy. Wash cloths are small enough to be a purse project. They can be as simple or as elaborate as you want. I've made three so far and I don't see an end in sight.

My gateway wash cloth was the Vintage Hankie Washcloth . This little beauty combines a knitted center with a crocheted edge. I'm working on getting my crochet groove back. This project gave me some crochet practice that I really enjoyed by the end. Those of you who were in the shop when I first started the crocheted edge—crochet and I made up by the end. LOL

I used three colors of Schachenmayr Catania. This 100% cotton sport weight yarn was a pleasure to work with. Catania comes in a 50g/137 yd put up and I worked the pattern with 3.5mm/US4 needles. The yarn has a slight sheen that gives a crisp, fanciness to anything you make out of it. Catania gives beautiful stitch definition yet yields a fabric soft enough for the most tender skin.

Vintage Hankie Washcloth.jpg

After crocheting the edging on the Vintage Hankie, I was feeling brave enough to try a crocheted washcloth. The Jazz Age Washcloth was super fun and very easy to make. I used Schachenmayr Catania again and a 4mm/G hook. This pattern yielded a sturdy wash and dry cloth that was still pretty enough to put out for company.

Jazz Age Washcloth.jpg

I had some yarn leftover, I put it to good use by whipping up a Grandmother’s Favorite Washcloth. This is an old pattern that has a number of variations. I used a basic version.

Grandmother's Favorite Washcloth.jpg

You know how it is when you make something that just tickles your fancy. I launched another wash cloth immediately. This time it was the Bodhi Leaf Washcloth , by Julia Farwell-Clay. The the delicate leaf shape was irresistible. I especially liked the thoughtful detail of the hanging loop on worked in to the design.

The yarn is Lang Canapa (DK) in 100% Hemp (25g/88yards).Yep, same plant, but it can't give you a “chemical” high as yarn. Hemp is a great choice for durable products it doesn't shrink, stretch, or pill. Hemp will also soften each time you wash it. Sounds scratchy, right, not even a little bit. Canapa is a smooth tightly spun yarn that works up easily. I used a 3.5 mm/US4 needle. For washcloths, hemp also has the added advantage of drying quickly and being naturally mildew resistant.

Bohdi Leaf Washcloth.jpg

You can probably tell I’m on a washcloth tear right now. They’re such quick, satisfying little projects that I think I’ll always have one on the needles or hook.